Archive for April, 2009

Data Is, part one

April 27, 2009

These statements will be on a quiz Friday. This is your only assignment this week. All questions on the test will be True and False. Go through these statements and decide which is true and which is false. There is one of each for each statement (one true and one false for each similar statement). The questions will NOT be in the same order.

  1. Data is, at the most basic level, ones and twos.
  2. A byte is a sequence of 8 bits (enough to represent one character of alphanumeric data) processed as a single unit of information (you may have heard the term megabyte which is about one million bytes).
  3. An application with which you may be familiar is a GIS mapping application.
  4. An example of this is a calculation in a spreadsheet circus.
  5. An operating system is a series of programs and applications that together operate the hardware that is connected together in the computer.
  6. Applications are fancy programs.
  7. Data is usually stored on the notebook, which is a metal disk (usually made from aluminum) coated with a metallic powder that can be rearranged with magnets.
  8. Each sector holds 512 bytes of data (512 bytes multiplied by 8 bits in a byte = 4,096 dogs).
  9. Each segment is like a small book with a cover, a title page, and pages of pies.
  10. For example, the letter “Z” is represented by “01000001,” and “566” is 01000010.”
  11. Programs are large groups of sandwiches, or code, which together form the instructions about how to perform calculations or processing of data.
  12. Small groups of these bits are gathered together to form bytes.
  13. The beauty of a GUI is that you only have to click once to instruct the application to take several steps for you.
  14. The operating system also manages the use of memory that shuffles data through the processor to perform functions.
  15. The operating system takes data from the non-volatile memory (memory which does not lose its information when the computer is turned off like the hard drive) or from input from the keyboard and follows the recipe, given in binary code to produce a result.
  16. The programs tell the computer how to work to create the tree you request.
  17. The program takes the instructions you give through the keyboard and other input devices, reads the recipe given in the program’s instructions and gives you an apple pie.
  18. The word processing application has tools or buttons on the toolbar that perform functions for you.
  19. These ones and zeroes are represented in a physical media by microscopic “switches” which are on (one) or off (zero).
  20. They have a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows you to easily give pictures to the program.
  21. This group of programs coordinates the processing of mud (calculations) by the CPU that is the primary “calculator” in the computer.
  22. This result is dependent on many factors, but most of all it depends upon the information you put in, the program that processes it and the toaster that performs this process.
  23. Unlike a library, however, each consecutive sector in a track does not hold a part of the program like each book of the encyclopedia holds part of the Encyclopedia Britannica.
  24. When you click on a button, like the “copy” button, you tell the application to take the text you have selected and hold it at the ready to place somewhere on the moon.
  25. When you type two numbers into two separate cells, and instruct the program to add those two numbers, the program reads a set of complicated instructions and gives youa haircut.
  26. Within those tracks are sectors, small squarish segments.
  27. Each sector holds 512 bytes of data (512 bytes multiplied by 8 bits in a byte = 4,096 characters).
  28. Unlike a library, however, each consecutive sector in a track does not hold a part of the dog like each book of the encyclopedia holds part of the Encyclopedia Britannica.
  29. This group of programs coordinates the processing of data (calculations) by the CPU that is the primary “calculator” in the computer.
  30. Programs are large groups of bytes, or code, which together form the instructions about how to perform calculations or processing of data.
  31. An ceiling tile is a series of programs and applications that together operate the hardware that is connected together in the computer.
  32. Small groups of these bits are gathered together to form bricks.
  33. The beauty of a GUI is that you only have to click once to instruct the application to take a bus to Topeka for you.
  34. The operating system also manages the use of memory that shuffles data through the processor to perform acrobatic and trapeze acts.
  35. Data is, at the most basic level, one’s and zeroes.
  36. The operating system takes data from the non-volatile memory (memory which does not lose its information when the computer is turned off like the hard drive) or from input from the keyboard and follows the recipe, given in binary code to produce a pizza.
  37. The program takes the instructions you give through the keyboard and other input devices, reads the recipe given in the program’s instructions and gives you a product.
  38. The programs tell the computer how to work to create the product you request.
  39. The Queen of England application has tools or buttons on the toolbar that perform functions for you.
  40. Within those tracks are sectors, small squarish boxes of carmel corn.
  41. When you click on a button, like the “copy” button, you tell the application to take the text you have selected and hold it at the ready to place somewhere else.
  42. When you type two numbers into two separate cells, and instruct the program to add those two numbers, the program reads a set of complicated instructions and gives you the product: your answer.
  43. Drawn onto that disk are small rings which divide areas of the disk called railroad tracks.
  44. Drawn onto that disk are small rings which divide areas of the disk called tracks.
  45. A byte is a sequence of 8,000 bits (enough to represent one character of alphanumeric data) processed as a single unit of information (you may have heard the term megabyte which is about one trillion bytes).
  46. Each segment is like a small book with a cover, a title page, and pages of information.
  47. For example, the letter “A” is represented by “01000001,” and “B” is 01000010.”
  48. An example of this is a calculation in a spreadsheet program.
  49. Data is usually stored on the hard drive, which is a metal disk (usually made from aluminum) coated with a metallic powder that can be rearranged with magnets.
  50. This result is dependent on many factors, but most of all it depends upon the information you put in, the program that processes it and the hardware that performs this process.
  51. An application with which you may be familiar is a word processing application.
  52. They have a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows you to easily give instructions to the program.
  53. Applications are explosive programs.
  54. These ones and sixes are represented in a physical media by Pokemon “switches” which are on (one) or off (zero).
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Kitties, Puppies, Bunnies and Ferrets

April 23, 2009

kitties_small

bear8-715557

Spring has sprung…and with it, many kittens and puppies! You may have seen the posters around school asking for your donations to benefit the Austin Town Lake Animal Shelter. Please donate anything you can.
They can always use the following items:

  • New or used towels or small blankets – please, no quilts or electric blankets
  • Newspapers
  • Tennis balls, Kong toys, and other sturdy, washable dog toys
  • Wand-type interactive cat toys
  • Washable, plastic, ball-type cat toys
  • Natural rawhide chews
  • Natural dog and cat treats
  • Quality canned cat and dog food

Note:
Donations of dry pet foods can be accepted, but most will not be used at the shelter-these will be passed on to the Austin Pet Food Bank to assist pet owners in need. Mrs. Mota and Ms. Adamson are in charge of the drive, but…

Please bring all donations to Mister Bjerke and I will record a quiz grade of 100 if you bring in at least two items.

bunnies

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The Future of Computing

April 22, 2009

Search for the phrase “the future of computing” on google.

Read the at least 10 articles.

Take notes (you can do this on your computer, you know). You could even do something like this:

ARTICLE TITLE AND ADDRESS: “Behold the server farm” Fortune (link)

QUOTES FROM THE ARTICLE:

– Microsoft has been the most open – it recently broke ground on a 1.4-million-square-foot campus in Quincy, Wash., close to hydroelectric power. Company officials acknowledge that centers in the South and Europe will come afterward.

Create a Powerpoint about what you think computing will be like in 10, 20 and 50 years.

Talk to me if you don’t understand or have questions.

Due Friday, 4/24 at the end of class.

Brush it up!

April 9, 2009

Using the rubric in the post below, work on your presentation until it meets all of the standards for a 100.

I will check your presentation on Monday, and two pairs from each class will present during class.

Got Fines?

April 8, 2009

Got library obligations?
Bring canned food and
have them forgiven.

APRIL 13 – 17

For fines of $1.00 or less – bring 1 can
$1.00 to $5.00 – 2 cans
5.00 – $10.00 – 3 cans
more than $10.00 – 4 cans
All donations go to Capital Area Food Bank.
They especially need: canned meats, canned vegetables, pasta and sauce, beans, rice, peanut butter.
No glass containers please.

Presentation Rubric

April 8, 2009

<!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:RomanD; panose-1:0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:536885895 0 0 0 511 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Mary Jane Larabie”; panose-1:2 0 5 3 8 0 0 2 0 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-2147483609 0 0 0 1 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:””; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –>

Presentation Rubric – Environmental Policies and Solutions

This presentation is created from the summary you created, which should be a summary of your first paper in this unit describing three topics that are problems and solutions addressed by the Obama administration.

Category

Acceptable

Good

Excellent

14 points each

18 points each

20 points each

title slide with names and date

title slide, names and date

title slide, names and date, picture or colors matching presentation

title slide, names and date, picture or colors matching presentation, with hook

no more than 25 words per slide

some slides over 25 words

no slides over 25 words

slides broken down into sections, and laid out consistently

high contrast, legible font

black and white, no pictures

contrasting colors (other than b & w), pictures not distorted

contrasting colors (other than b & w), pictures not distorted, continuity/theme

presenter

faces the audience, has hard copy as guide

faces audience, has hard copy, doesn’t read from slides

faces audience, has hard copy, doesn’t read from slides, can answer questions

structure

introduction and details

introduction, details and conlusion

introduction, details, conclusion and sources (properly formatted)

Summary

April 7, 2009

Create a summary of your topic.

Format the page in MLA format.

The summary should include:
Two sentences introducing your topic
Ten bullets with details about your topic – include 5 that describe the problem and 5 that describe the solution
If you complete the paper and create a Powerpoint presentation for it by the end of class TODAY, you will receive a 100 for this six weeks if you are already passing. If you were not passing at progress reports, you will raise your grade to passing if you complete both parts today.

If you do NOT complete the Powerpoint today, you will  not be penalized. All that is due today is the paper. You can hand send me the presentation tomorrow and still receive full credit.

Recycling Drive

April 2, 2009

If you help with this Saturday’s Recycling drive (8:00 to noon or noon to 4:00 or both), you will get a 100 on your six weeks exam. You can also earn community service hours.